Many investors mistakenly base the success of their portfolios on returns alone (see "Gauge Portfolio Performance by Measuring Returns"). Few consider the risk that they took to achieve those returns. Since the 1960s, investors have known how to quantify and measure risk with the variability of returns, but no single measure actually looked at bothrisk and return together. Nowadays, we have three sets of performance measurement tools to assist us with our portfolio evaluations.

The Treynor, Sharpe and Jensen ratios combine risk and return performance into a single value, but each is slightly different. Which one is best for you? Why should you care? Let's find out.

Treynor Measure

Jack L. Treynor was the first to provide investors with a composite measure of portfolio performance that also included risk. Treynor's objective was to find a performance measure that could apply to all investors, regardless of their personal risk preferences. He suggested that there were really two components of risk: the risk produced by fluctuations in the stock market and the risk arising from the fluctuations of individual securities.

Treynor introduced the concept of the security market line, which defines the relationship between portfolio returns and market rates of returns, whereby the slope of the line measures the relative volatility between the portfolio and the market (as represented by beta). The beta coefficient is simply the volatility measure of a stock portfolio to the market itself. The greater the line's slope, the better the risk-return tradeoff.


Source : Investopedia