The cash conversion cycle (CCC) is one of several measures of management effectiveness. It measures how fast a company can convert cash on hand into even more cash on hand. The CCC does this by following the cash as it is first converted into inventory and accounts payable (AP), through sales and accounts receivable (AR), and then back into cash. Generally, the lower this number is, the better for the company. Although it should be combined with other metrics (such as return on equity and return on assets), the cash conversion cycle can be especially useful for comparing close competitors because the company with the lowest CCC is often the one with better management. In this article, we'll explain how CCC works and show you how to use it to evaluate potential investments. (See also: What Does the Cash Conversion Cycle Tell Us About a Company's Managment?)

What Is It?

The CCC is a combination of several activity ratios involving accounts receivable, accounts payable and inventory turnover. AR and inventory are short-term assets, while AP is a liability; all of these ratios are found on the balance sheet. In essence, the ratios indicate how efficiently management is using short-term assets and liabilities to generate cash. This allows an investor to gauge the company's overall health.


Source : Investopedia